Inquisitive Minds Podcast Critical Thinking on History, Religion, Politics and Culture

This is Part 2 of our interview with Dr. Hector Avalos (Iowa State University). In this week's episode, Prof. Avalos answers a wide array of questions. He shared his thoughts on the Historical Jesus, health care and the rise of Christianity, scarce resource theory in relation to religion and violence, the role and responsibilities of biblical and religion scholars in today's world, the end of biblical studies, and his future research projects, and many more topics. Once again, listeners will appreciate Dr. Avalos' perspective on such crucial issues.

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In this last podcast dedicated to Hector Avalos' book The End of Biblical Studies, we examine the final three chapters (7-10) which look at the role academia, learned societies, and the media play in trying to promote the idea that the Bible is still relevant today. We also discuss how the author's critical assessment resonates with our own experience as biblical scholars. After several weeks discussing this book, we hope that listeners understand and appreciate the significance of Dr. Avalos' important work.

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This is the fourth installment of our discussion of Hector Avalos' book The End of Biblical Studies. This week we focus on the chapters dealing with Literary Criticism (Ch. 5) and Biblical Theology (Ch. 6). Dr. Avalos rightly remarks that, "literary aesthetics are still being used as the handmaiden of apologetics" (p. 220). As for biblical theology, it is truly an impossible enterprise. The Bible contains many theological discourses; so which biblical theology should one embrace? There is no one unified theology; rather, there are many theologies. This is why, "biblical theology is a thoroughly religionist endeavor" (p. 250). 

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