Inquisitive Minds Podcast Critical Thinking on History, Religion, Politics and Culture

This week, we start a series of podcasts discussing Tim Whitmarsh's, Battling the Gods: Atheism in the Ancient World. In this episode we will discuss how the ancient Greek world differentiated between the sacred and the profane, despite the fact that people embraced polytheism. We will also note that Greeks did not consider their texts as sacred, certainly not in the sense Jews, Christians and Muslims understand their own scriptures. Homer's Iliad and Odyssey were not sacred texts even if they are comprised of divine characters; these are rather to be understood as myth. We will end our podcast with an important note on the concept of "mimesis" and how such a practice could be understood as a "battle with the gods" (theomachy), a way to contest their very existence.

00:0000:00
In this episode, we continue last week's discussion on the possible connections between Homer and the gospels. We also look at how several Hebrew Bible stories were imitated by the writers of the story of Jesus. Some of the examples discussed are taken from MacDonald's recent book on imitations of Greek epic in Mark and the works of Luke-Acts.

00:0000:00
February 2, 2015  
The idea that the gospel writers imitated ancient classical texts has been explored by several authors. D.R. MacDonald has written a book explaining how the New Testament gospels were the product of mimesis, and that Homer's Iliad and Odyssey served as foundational texts from which the writers build their own stories of Jesus. In the podcast we explore mimetic criticism and offer an assessment of MacDonald's hypothesis and criteria used in the study of ancient religious texts.

00:0000:00